After Action : Mossberg Shooters Source Shotgun Championship

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The Mossberg Shooters Source Shotgun Championship proved to be quite a challenging match. Since we shoot a disproportionate amount of shotguns in our matches up north, I fully expected to step up to the plate and dominate this match. Little did I know, they play shotguns a little differently in Texas. Due to some range restrictions, and to level the playing field a little bit, Minnesota matches usually restrict shot size to 7 ½ or smaller and many of the MD’s set targets so they are possible (if only barely so) to be knocked over with an Improved Cylinder choke. In Texas…they have no such rules. The winner of the match there is the one who has mastered all aspects of the shotgun- to include various shot payloads and choke constrictions.

At first glance the stages seemed pretty straight forward with little if any of the tricky shenanigans we do to each other up north, but then I started examining the targets. These were not little 5×5’s sitting on a wobbly stand that could be knocked off with a breath of #8’s. Oh no, These were heavy AR 500 plates that sat very solidly with a little lip in front of their stands and required a stiff throat punch to dethrone. Now put those targets 30-40 yards away and you have a target that can take a square hit of Super Sports on the chin and laugh. This was probably my favorite part of the match because some of these targets literally required buck shot, or at least some angry #6’s, to knock down. Boy what I would have given for some #6’s…Of course I would love to see more areal and circus targets in addition to other trickery whenever it is available, but this match certainly was a challenge in its own right and had some interesting targets such as skinny bowling pin silhouettes which were a unique challenge. North Texas Multigun truly tested the full breath of shotgun skills.

Aside from a tough lesson in Texas scatter blasting, the match went pretty well for me personally. I also learned that after 6 years and 10,000ish rounds, some of the little tiny springs in the M2 receiver wear out…who knew? I was able to power through and work my way up to a 5th place finish. The Triple C ranch is a really cool venue with a stunning amount of natural terrain opportunities. North Texas Multigun put on a first class match that flowed well and provided catered meals both days. I have been very blessed to have had the opportunity to travel so many places to shoot major matches, but Texas is quickly becoming my favorite destination for epic shooting adventures. With the Vortex Shooter’s Source 3-Gun Championship on the horizon in July, I can hardly wait to see what North Texas Multigun has in store next… and I will have half a case of pheasant shells with me, just in case.

By | 2017-04-06T16:54:32+00:00 April 4th, 2016|3 Gun Matches : After Action|0 Comments

About the Author:

I’ve always had a fascination with firearms from a very young age. I got into shooting and the shooting sports the same way many people do- through hunting. As time went on though, I realized I was more interested in challenges in marksmanship than the actual pursuit of wild game and my shooting focus is now almost entirely shifted toward competition shooting. I shot on many club trap and skeet teams in my teen years and was very successful in that arena. My first exposure to practical shooting was on TV with a show called American Shooter (still on the air under a different name) when I was about 14 years old and from then on I was hooked. I didn’t know when or how or if I would ever be any good, but I had to get into practical shooting. On my 21st birthday I bought a Springfield TRP 45ACP 1911 and dove into IDPA and it wasn’t long before I was active in USPSA and 3-Gun as well. Professionally I have a B.S. degree spanning agricultural sciences and agribusiness. I have worked in a variety of commercial farming roles across the country and currently have began working in the firearms and accessories industry.

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